STUMBLING BLOCKS AS STEPPING STONES-2

Stepping-stones-to-success-mistakes-100

ALL

The phrase with ALL <*We all were delighted…> is wrong. The right variant is <We were ALL delighted…>.  Also correct is: <We must ALL try to find…> (not <*We ALL must try to find…>). ALL usually goes immediately after the (first) auxiliary verb. When there is no auxiliary verb, ALL is placed immediately before the main verb: <We ALL passed the exam.> However, when the main verb is BE, ALL is placed immediately after it: <The letters are ALL on your desk> The same rule about their position in relation to the auxiliary verb, the main verb and the verb BE is true for the adverbs ALMOST, ALREADY, ALWAYS, ALSO etc.: Correct variants: <I had ALMOST finished the letter, when …>, <They are ALREADY aware of this problem,> <He is ALWAYS in a bad mood,> <You should ALWAYS take care, when…>

ALONE :: LONELY.

ALONE = by yourself, not with anyone, without other people present  <He thought about getting married, but he preferred living ALONE> LONELY = sad because you are ALONE.

ALONE :: ON YOUR OWN

It’s wrong to say <*A child learns a lot by doing this ALONE.” Correct: <A child learns a lot by doing this ON HIS OR HER OWN, i.e. without anyone’s help or supervision, independently>

ALLOW

The pronoun “it” is NOT used as a preparatory subject before ALLOW. Wrong: <*It is not allowed to talk in the library> Correct: <People are not allowed to talk in the library> or <Talking in the library is not allowed>

ALSO

Sometimes I come across native speakers who use the word ALSO in negative clauses, which is not recommended by the official grammar. As for the place of ALSO in the sentence, it can – according to the BBC Learning English – go in lots of places, including the beginning of the sentence when it is separated with a comma, e.g.:

Also, I think that you should consider quitting your job.
also think that you should consider quitting your job.
I think that you also should consider quitting your job.
I think that you should also consider quitting your job.
I think that you should consider also quitting your job.
I think that you should consider quitting your job also.

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern Usage says that in talk, where the informal stringing of afterthoughts is legitimate, there is no objection to ALSO. But it is the writer’s ordinary duty to settle up with his afterthoughts  before he writes his sentence, and consequently, the unassisted ALSO that is proper to the afterthought gives a slovenly air to its sentence <Remember your passport and money. Also the tickets>

ALTERNATE :: ALTERNATIVE

In British English ALTERNATE means 1) “happening in turn, first one, than the other” <alternate periods of sun and rain> 2) “every second (day, week, etc.)” <Our local football team plays at home on alternate Sundays> ALTERNATIVE = (of two or more things) that may be used, had, done, etc., instead of another. In American English ALTERNATE can also be used with the same meaning as ALTERNATIVE. Thus, the two following sentences mean the same: American English: <We decided to make ALTERNATE arrangements in case the hotel was fully booked> British English: <We decided to make ALTERNATIVE arrangements in case the hotel was fully booked>  Please, notice the usage of the verb ALTERNATE (with the  difference in pronunciation between the adjective [ôl′tər-nit ] and the verb  [ôl′tər-nāt′, ăl′-]): <The students alternated at the computer>

ALWAYS

The word means “at all times, every time,” which is why it’s wrong to say <*While he was writing the letter, he always scratched his chin>. The correct version is: < While he was writing the letter, he kept scratching his chin, i.e. scratched his chin repeatedly>

Advertisements

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: